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We deliver immunisations to children and young people in schools across the North East.


FAQs

Specialist nurses from our trust deliver the national immunisation programme in schools in Northumberland, Newcastle, North Tyneside.

The national immunisation programme aims to give children the best protection against a range of infections and diseases, ensuring that they are protected from infancy, through their teenage years and on to adulthood.

The high level of vaccine coverage has meant that dangerous, vaccine-preventable diseases, such as polio, are rare in the UK. However, experience shows that these diseases can come back if the number of immunised children falls – they are still around in many countries throughout the world.

The immunisation programme includes the annual flu vaccination for children in reception to year 6 in mainstream schools and up to year 13 in Special Schools. HPV is now being offered to all children in year 8 to protect against different HPV related cancers. The ‘three in one’ teenage booster for diphtheria, tetanus and polio and meningitis ACWY is given to all pupils aged 13-14.

We work in partnership with Public Health England, schools (including state, independent and special schools) and pupil referral units as well as home-educated children and traveller families, GPs, the 0-19 community services and looked-after children’s teams to deliver the service. The service is offered to all children up to the age of 18 years old, either living in, or resident in the North of Tyne region.

The team can also provide expert advice to children and families, other professionals and schools regarding immunisation and vaccination issues.

Our immunisation programmes are primarily carried out in schools and are delivered according to national campaigns and the childhood immunisation schedule. You can read more here about the childhood vaccination schedule here 

Your child will receive their immunisation at school, but we also offer local catch-up clinics for those who have been absent during school vaccination programmes or for young people who are home educated or require extra support due to their personal needs.

Anyone can refer into the service if they think a school aged child has missed their immunisations. This can be done by contacting the service directly and we can discuss how the child can receive their immunisations.

Consent forms, along with information, are sent out via your child’s school prior to each immunisation programme and handed out to the children to take home. Parents will be given a date by the school to return these forms. The nurse will check the consent form before the immunisation date to ensure the form is fully complete and that there are no other issues for which parents may need to be contacted for.

It is vital that forms are returned to school, even if parents do not consent to their child being immunised. Your child will be assessed on the day of their immunisation to ensure they are well enough to receive the vaccination.

Nasal flu immunisations primary schools (reception – year 6 in mainstream schools and reception – year 13 in Special Schools)

Flu can be very unpleasant for children. They have the same symptoms as adults and some children develop a very high fever or complications of flu such as pneumonia. They may need hospital treatment, and very occasionally a child may die from flu. For children with long-term health conditions such as diabetes, asthma, heart disease or lung disease, getting flu can be very serious as they are more at risk of developing serious complications.

The flu vaccine for children is needle-free and given as a single dose of nasal spray squirted up each nostril. It has few side effects and, due to its properties, works better than the injectable vaccine. It’s quick and painless and will mean your child is less likely to become ill if they come into contact with the flu virus. Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust has produced a child friendly video you can watch here. You can also find further information on the NHS website here.

During September and May/June the vaccine to protect against HPV is being offered to your child.  By having a course of two vaccinations, your child will be protected against the HPV virus for many years to come.  This will protect against several different HPV related cancers in boys and girls. NHS Choices has more information and nidirect government servicesis a good resource for young people.

Diphtheria, Tetanus and Polio (DTP) and Meningitis ACWY (Men ACWY) – (Year 9 male and female)

The Tetanus, Diphtheria and Polio (Td/IPV) and Meningococcal (Men) ACWY are two vaccines given at the same time, one in each upper arm.  The teenage booster, also known as the 3-in-1 or the Td/IPV vaccine, is given as one injection to boost your child’s protection against three separate diseases: tetanus, diphtheria and polio.

There are very few teenagers who cannot have the Td/IPV vaccines. If you are worried please contact your local immunisation team for advice or talk to your practice nurse or doctor.

The Men ACWY vaccine is given as one injection and protects against four different causes of meningitis and septicaemia –meningococcal (Men) A, C, W and Y diseases. Younger teenagers will be offered the Men ACWY vaccine in school as part of the routine adolescent schools programme alongside the 3-in-1 teenage booster.

  • Diphtheria is a serious disease that usually begins with a sore throat and can quickly cause breathing problems. It can damage the heart and nervous system and, in severe cases, it can kill.
  • Tetanus is a painful disease affecting the nervous system which can lead to muscle spasms, breathing problems and can be fatal.
  • Polio is a virus that attacks the nervous system which can cause permanent paralysis of muscles. If it affects the chest muscles or the brain, polio can kill.

Further information can be found here 

 

Meningitis Vaccine (Men ACWY)

Meningitis is inflammation of the lining of the brain. One of the most serious and common causes of meningitis is by meningococcal bacteria. As well as meningitis, meningococcal infection can lead to septicaemia (blood poisoning), both of which can be very serious or fatal.

Teenagers are at higher risk of developing meningococcal disease and will be offered the vaccine which protects against four different types of Meningitis: A, C, W and Y at the same time as the teenage booster.

Further information can be found here.

 

Diphtheria, Tetanus and Polio (DTP) and Meningitis ACWY (Men ACWY) – (Year 9 male and female)

The Tetanus, Diphtheria and Polio (Td/IPV) and Meningococcal (Men) ACWY are two vaccines given at the same time, one in each upper arm.  The teenage booster, also known as the 3-in-1 or the Td/IPV vaccine, is given as one injection to boost your child’s protection against three separate diseases: tetanus, diphtheria and polio.

There are very few teenagers who cannot have the Td/IPV vaccines. If you are worried please contact your local immunisation team for advice or talk to your practice nurse or doctor.

The Men ACWY vaccine is given as one injection and protects against four different causes of meningitis and septicaemia –meningococcal (Men) A, C, W and Y diseases. Younger teenagers will be offered the Men ACWY vaccine in school as part of the routine adolescent schools programme alongside the 3-in-1 teenage booster.

  • Diphtheria is a serious disease that usually begins with a sore throat and can quickly cause breathing problems. It can damage the heart and nervous system and, in severe cases, it can kill.
  • Tetanus is a painful disease affecting the nervous system which can lead to muscle spasms, breathing problems and can be fatal.
  • Polio is a virus that attacks the nervous system which can cause permanent paralysis of muscles. If it affects the chest muscles or the brain, polio can kill.

Further information can be found here 

 

Meningitis Vaccine (Men ACWY)

Meningitis is inflammation of the lining of the brain. One of the most serious and common causes of meningitis is by meningococcal bacteria. As well as meningitis, meningococcal infection can lead to septicaemia (blood poisoning), both of which can be very serious or fatal.

Teenagers are at higher risk of developing meningococcal disease and will be offered the vaccine which protects against four different types of Meningitis: A, C, W and Y at the same time as the teenage booster.

Further information can be found here.

If you have any questions contact us:

Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm

 

North Tyneside Schools

0191 2828979

 

Newcastle Schools 

0191 2828978

 

Northumberland Schools

0191 2828977

 

Administrator Team

0191 2828976


Location:

There is now just one central location for all three teams:

 

Northumbria Healthcare Trust

Seaton Delaval Innovation Hub

Avenue Road

Seaton Delaval

Whitley Bay

Tyne & Wear

NE25 0EG